Dr. Pecora on Updated MAIA Data in Multiple Myeloma

Andrew Pecora, MD, FACP, CPE
Published: Wednesday, Jun 19, 2019



Andrew Pecora, MD, FACP, CPE, president physician enterprise, chief innovation officer, John Theurer Cancer Center, Hackensack Meridian Health, discusses the impact age has on the efficacy and safety of daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone (DRd) in patients with transplant-ineligible newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) as part of the MAIA study.

In the third phase of the MAIA study, researchers found DRd significantly reduced the risk of progression or death by 44% compared with lenalidomide/dexamethasone (Rd). To examine the drug’s efficacy in aging populations, a researchers conducted a subgroup analysis in patients aged <75 and ≥75. Patients, in their respective age groups, were split evenly between receiving Rd and DRd.

The median progression-free survival (PFS) was not significantly prolonged for DRd versus Rd in either age group. PFS data was not reached for DRd in either age group, but Rd had a PFS of 31.9 months in ≥75 patients and 33.7 months in <75 patients.

Patients in both age groups who received DRd versus Rd had better overall response rates (ORR; ≥75: 90% and 81%, respectively; <75: 95% and 82%), complete responses (CR; ≥75: 41% and 25%, respectively; <75: 52% and 25%), and very good partial responses (VGPR; ≥75: 77% and 53%, respectively; <75: 81% and 53%).
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


Andrew Pecora, MD, FACP, CPE, president physician enterprise, chief innovation officer, John Theurer Cancer Center, Hackensack Meridian Health, discusses the impact age has on the efficacy and safety of daratumumab (Darzalex) in combination with lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone (DRd) in patients with transplant-ineligible newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) as part of the MAIA study.

In the third phase of the MAIA study, researchers found DRd significantly reduced the risk of progression or death by 44% compared with lenalidomide/dexamethasone (Rd). To examine the drug’s efficacy in aging populations, a researchers conducted a subgroup analysis in patients aged <75 and ≥75. Patients, in their respective age groups, were split evenly between receiving Rd and DRd.

The median progression-free survival (PFS) was not significantly prolonged for DRd versus Rd in either age group. PFS data was not reached for DRd in either age group, but Rd had a PFS of 31.9 months in ≥75 patients and 33.7 months in <75 patients.

Patients in both age groups who received DRd versus Rd had better overall response rates (ORR; ≥75: 90% and 81%, respectively; <75: 95% and 82%), complete responses (CR; ≥75: 41% and 25%, respectively; <75: 52% and 25%), and very good partial responses (VGPR; ≥75: 77% and 53%, respectively; <75: 81% and 53%).



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x