Dr. Pegram Discusses Adjuvant Pertuzumab in HER2+ Breast Cancer

Mark D. Pegram, MD
Published: Friday, May 11, 2018



Mark D. Pegram, MD, Susy Yuan-Huey Hung Professor, co-director, Stanford’s Molecular Therapeutics Program, director, Breast Cancer Oncology Program, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center, discusses the use of adjuvant pertuzumab (Perjeta) in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

Pegram says it is a very exciting time for drug development in the HER2-positive breast cancer space. Recent FDA approvals have added to the armamentarium of treatments for early-stage disease.

In December 2017, the FDA approved pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab (Herceptin) and chemotherapy as an adjuvant treatment for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. This was based off the results from the phase III APHINITY trial, which demonstrated a 3-year invasive disease-free survival rate of 94.1% with the pertuzumab regimen compared with 93.2% with trastuzumab, chemotherapy, and placebo.

This was a positive study, but the difficulty with the trial is that it was done in a low-risk population, says Pegram. It met its statistical endpoint with confidence, but Pegram says that the absolute benefit of adjuvant pertuzumab is small.
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


Mark D. Pegram, MD, Susy Yuan-Huey Hung Professor, co-director, Stanford’s Molecular Therapeutics Program, director, Breast Cancer Oncology Program, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center, discusses the use of adjuvant pertuzumab (Perjeta) in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

Pegram says it is a very exciting time for drug development in the HER2-positive breast cancer space. Recent FDA approvals have added to the armamentarium of treatments for early-stage disease.

In December 2017, the FDA approved pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab (Herceptin) and chemotherapy as an adjuvant treatment for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. This was based off the results from the phase III APHINITY trial, which demonstrated a 3-year invasive disease-free survival rate of 94.1% with the pertuzumab regimen compared with 93.2% with trastuzumab, chemotherapy, and placebo.

This was a positive study, but the difficulty with the trial is that it was done in a low-risk population, says Pegram. It met its statistical endpoint with confidence, but Pegram says that the absolute benefit of adjuvant pertuzumab is small.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Archived Version of a Live Webcast: Virtual Current Trends™: European Perspectives on the Advancing Role of CAR T-Cell Therapy in Hematologic MalignanciesJun 29, 20192.0
Community Practice Connections™: Practical Application of Sequencing for EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancers: A Focus on Recent Evidence and Key Next Steps in TrialsJun 29, 20192.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x