Dr. Philip Discusses the Use of Lutathera in NETs

Philip A. Philip, MD, PhD, FRCP
Published: Wednesday, Jun 19, 2019



Philip A. Philip, MD, PhD, FRCP, professor of Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, clinical professor of Oncology at Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, discusses the use of Lutathera (lutetium Lu 177 dotatate) in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

The peptide receptor radionuclide therapy Lutathera is a relatively new treatment option in the United States. The therapy was approved by the FDA in January 2018 as a result of the phase III NETTER-1 study. The treatment targets the somatostatin receptor, which is expressed in approximately 80% to 90% of patients who have well-differentiated NETs. However, patients with poorly differentiated NETs may also express it, Philip notes.

Traditionally, the somatostatin analogs octreotide (Sandostatin) and lanreotide (Somatuline Depot) have been used to target the somatostatin receptor, but Lutathera now represents another option in this setting. By attaching a radioactive payload to the ligand that binds to the somatostatin receptor, the therapy can kill the cancer cells, Philip says.

Lutetium-177 is the active radioactive isotype in Lutathera. Lutathera is given systemically as 4 treatments, 2 months apart. The treatment itself is given intravenously over a course of 30 minutes, says Philip.
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Philip A. Philip, MD, PhD, FRCP, professor of Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, clinical professor of Oncology at Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, discusses the use of Lutathera (lutetium Lu 177 dotatate) in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

The peptide receptor radionuclide therapy Lutathera is a relatively new treatment option in the United States. The therapy was approved by the FDA in January 2018 as a result of the phase III NETTER-1 study. The treatment targets the somatostatin receptor, which is expressed in approximately 80% to 90% of patients who have well-differentiated NETs. However, patients with poorly differentiated NETs may also express it, Philip notes.

Traditionally, the somatostatin analogs octreotide (Sandostatin) and lanreotide (Somatuline Depot) have been used to target the somatostatin receptor, but Lutathera now represents another option in this setting. By attaching a radioactive payload to the ligand that binds to the somatostatin receptor, the therapy can kill the cancer cells, Philip says.

Lutetium-177 is the active radioactive isotype in Lutathera. Lutathera is given systemically as 4 treatments, 2 months apart. The treatment itself is given intravenously over a course of 30 minutes, says Philip.

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