Dr. Reeder on Future Treatment Approaches in Aggressive Lymphomas

Craig B. Reeder, MD
Published: Tuesday, Feb 07, 2017



Craig B. Reeder, MD, assistant professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, discusses some future treatment approaches for patients with aggressive lymphomas, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).

Reeder hopes that the community are able to use regimens more like an infusion, dose-adjusted regimen of etoposide phosphate, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and rituximab (EPOCH-R). Future research should determine whether this regimen, or a novel agent such as lenalidomide (Revlimid) or ibrutinib (Imbruvica), will have a benefit for patients with these high-risk lymphomas, should they turn out to be much more effective.

Additionally, researchers are now able to phenotype the large cell lymphomas into the activated B-cell (ABC) type versus the germinal center B-cell type (GCB) type. Researchers hope that these drugs will be beneficial for each of the subtypes and will represent a more individualized approach.  

The 2 subtypes have typically been based on gene expression profiling, Reeder says, adding that it is a tedious process. The various approaches have included immunohistochemistry, the Hans algorithm, and phenotyping either into GCB or ABC. GCB subtypes are likely to have better outcomes with R-CHOP than the non-GCB or ABC types.


Craig B. Reeder, MD, assistant professor of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, discusses some future treatment approaches for patients with aggressive lymphomas, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).

Reeder hopes that the community are able to use regimens more like an infusion, dose-adjusted regimen of etoposide phosphate, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and rituximab (EPOCH-R). Future research should determine whether this regimen, or a novel agent such as lenalidomide (Revlimid) or ibrutinib (Imbruvica), will have a benefit for patients with these high-risk lymphomas, should they turn out to be much more effective.

Additionally, researchers are now able to phenotype the large cell lymphomas into the activated B-cell (ABC) type versus the germinal center B-cell type (GCB) type. Researchers hope that these drugs will be beneficial for each of the subtypes and will represent a more individualized approach.  

The 2 subtypes have typically been based on gene expression profiling, Reeder says, adding that it is a tedious process. The various approaches have included immunohistochemistry, the Hans algorithm, and phenotyping either into GCB or ABC. GCB subtypes are likely to have better outcomes with R-CHOP than the non-GCB or ABC types.



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 2nd Annual European Congress on Hematology™: Focus on Lymphoid MalignanciesDec 30, 20182.0
Community Practice Connections™: New Directions in Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Emerging Evidence of ImmunotherapyAug 13, 20191.5
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