Dr. Shlomo Koyfman on Radiation in Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

Shlomo Koyfman, MD
Published: Monday, Nov 21, 2016


Shlomo Koyfman, MD, associate staff, radiation oncology, Cleveland Clinic, discusses radiation therapy in recurrent head and neck cancer.
 
Researchers at 8 institutions evaluated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to determine outcomes in the reirradiation setting for recurrent head and neck cancer. 
 
This is a challenging group of patients and the treatment is historically considered high-risk, with significant toxicities. However, all studies regarding this treatment in this patient population are very old, so there is little understanding of modern use, says Koyfman.
 
The analysis found that cure rates are higher and the toxicities are much lower with IMRT and SBRT than older studies show. This is really important for oncologists to know because many patients are not going currently being offered these treatments due to perceived toxicities, says Koyfman.
 
The analysis also stratified patients into 3 categories, and found that each group has a significantly different survival rate. This information will be helpful in determining which patients should receive IMRT and SBRT treatment.
 

Shlomo Koyfman, MD, associate staff, radiation oncology, Cleveland Clinic, discusses radiation therapy in recurrent head and neck cancer.
 
Researchers at 8 institutions evaluated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to determine outcomes in the reirradiation setting for recurrent head and neck cancer. 
 
This is a challenging group of patients and the treatment is historically considered high-risk, with significant toxicities. However, all studies regarding this treatment in this patient population are very old, so there is little understanding of modern use, says Koyfman.
 
The analysis found that cure rates are higher and the toxicities are much lower with IMRT and SBRT than older studies show. This is really important for oncologists to know because many patients are not going currently being offered these treatments due to perceived toxicities, says Koyfman.
 
The analysis also stratified patients into 3 categories, and found that each group has a significantly different survival rate. This information will be helpful in determining which patients should receive IMRT and SBRT treatment.
 

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
Community Practice Connections™: Precision Medicine for Community Oncologists: Assessing the Role of Tumor-Testing Technologies in Cancer CareNov 30, 20181.0
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