Dr. Somer on Education for Biosimilars

Bradley G. Somer, MD
Published: Wednesday, Nov 20, 2019



Bradley G. Somer, MD, associate professor, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, medical oncologist, senior partner, Executive Cancer Council, and head of strategic expansion/development, West Cancer Center Research Program, West Cancer Center, discusses the education surrounding biosimilars in oncology.

Physicians can educate themselves on biosimilars using medical education programs, the same way they would educate themselves about efficacy related to treatments, explains Somer. He suggests that medical organizations, such as ASCO and ESMO have biosimilar education at the forefront of their programing. Comparative studies looking at biosimilars are being conducted, but the conversation regarding biosimilars needs to develop regarding how to implement biosimilars in practice, says Somer.

Decisions regarding biosimilar’s place in oncology need to be made because oncologists are interested in ensuring their patients receive the best care. The oncology system needs to consider treatment more holistically and decide on treatments with the best value without giving up efficacy, according to Somer. As long as there is no change in efficacy, the better valued option can be used, concludes Somer.
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Bradley G. Somer, MD, associate professor, Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, medical oncologist, senior partner, Executive Cancer Council, and head of strategic expansion/development, West Cancer Center Research Program, West Cancer Center, discusses the education surrounding biosimilars in oncology.

Physicians can educate themselves on biosimilars using medical education programs, the same way they would educate themselves about efficacy related to treatments, explains Somer. He suggests that medical organizations, such as ASCO and ESMO have biosimilar education at the forefront of their programing. Comparative studies looking at biosimilars are being conducted, but the conversation regarding biosimilars needs to develop regarding how to implement biosimilars in practice, says Somer.

Decisions regarding biosimilar’s place in oncology need to be made because oncologists are interested in ensuring their patients receive the best care. The oncology system needs to consider treatment more holistically and decide on treatments with the best value without giving up efficacy, according to Somer. As long as there is no change in efficacy, the better valued option can be used, concludes Somer.



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