Dr. Wallen on Technological Advances in NSCLC

Jason M. Wallen, MD, MBA, FACS, FCCP
Published: Wednesday, Mar 27, 2019



Jason M. Wallen, MD, MBA, FACS, FCCP, associate professor of surgery, division chief of thoracic surgery, director of gastric and esophageal cancer program, medical director of the thoracic oncology program, Upstate University Hospital, discusses technological advances made in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Endobronchial ultrasounds and bronchoscopies can be used to stage patients. In terms of more recent advances, electromagnetic navigation can be used for bronchoscopy and percutaneous needle biopsy with portable, user-friendly equipment, allowing for several procedures to be performed with a single set of equipment, says Wallen. Previously, several procedures were necessary to appropriately diagnose and stage a patient. Now, these assessments can be done on a single day in a single setting.

Regarding surgery, minimally invasive techniques are now standard of care. Robotic surgery, explains Wallen, is newer to the field, and allows for more complex surgeries. In terms of palliation, technologies have remained fairly consistent, although emerging techniques with laser therapy have been shown to have a positive impact on patients’ quality of life, concludes Wallen.
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Jason M. Wallen, MD, MBA, FACS, FCCP, associate professor of surgery, division chief of thoracic surgery, director of gastric and esophageal cancer program, medical director of the thoracic oncology program, Upstate University Hospital, discusses technological advances made in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Endobronchial ultrasounds and bronchoscopies can be used to stage patients. In terms of more recent advances, electromagnetic navigation can be used for bronchoscopy and percutaneous needle biopsy with portable, user-friendly equipment, allowing for several procedures to be performed with a single set of equipment, says Wallen. Previously, several procedures were necessary to appropriately diagnose and stage a patient. Now, these assessments can be done on a single day in a single setting.

Regarding surgery, minimally invasive techniques are now standard of care. Robotic surgery, explains Wallen, is newer to the field, and allows for more complex surgeries. In terms of palliation, technologies have remained fairly consistent, although emerging techniques with laser therapy have been shown to have a positive impact on patients’ quality of life, concludes Wallen.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Online Medical Crossfire®: 5th Annual Miami Lung Cancer ConferenceMay 30, 20196.5
Community Practice Connections™: Working Group for Changing Standards in EGFR-Mutated Lung Cancers: Real-World Applications of the Evidence for NursesJun 29, 20191.5
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