Second Cancers Can Wield Greater Impact on Adolescent and Young Adult Survivors

Theresa Keegan, PhD, MS
Published: Thursday, Jun 08, 2017
UC DavisTheresa Keegan, PhD, MS
Theresa Keegan, PhD, MS
 
Associate Professor
Cancer Epidemiology and Survivorship
Division of Hematology and Oncology
UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center Sacramento, CA
Strategic Partnership
Advances in treatment and supportive care have resulted in substantial improvements in cancer survival and a growing number of cancer survivors in the United States. These survivors, however, are at an increased risk of developing a second cancer due to genetic factors, the carcinogenic effects of cancer treatment, common exposures (eg, tobacco), and other as yet unknown factors. The risk of developing a second cancer also varies by age, with those diagnosed with their first cancer during childhood having the highest risk. The burden of second cancers in survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancers (15-39 years) is also high; they have a higher risk of developing a second cancer than older cancer survivors and have the highest absolute excess risk of a second cancer, or excess cancers per 10,000 person-years, among all age groups.

 

Figure. Second Primary Malignancies

Figure. Second Primary Malignancies

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Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Online Medical Crossfire®: 5th Annual Miami Lung Cancer ConferenceMay 30, 20196.5
Medical Crossfire®: New Frontiers in the Management of GvHD: Uncovering the Latest Advances to Improve Post-Transplant CareMay 31, 20191.5
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