Video

Dr. Ai on Potential With Mogamulizumab in CTCL

Weiyun Z. Ai, MD, PhD, assistant clinical professor, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, speaks to the relevance of mogamulizumab (Poteligeo) in treating Sezary syndrome, a rare and aggressive form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Weiyun Z. Ai, MD, PhD, assistant clinical professor, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, speaks to the relevance of mogamulizumab (Poteligeo) in treating Sezary syndrome, a rare and aggressive form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).

Data presented from the MAVORIC study revealed that mogamuliazumab is an active drug that clears the blood very quickly and is relatively well tolerated in treating patients with CTCL. The drug is especially active in Sezary syndrome, a leukemia form of CTCL in which statistics reflect an overall survival (OS) of 5 years. Though biologic therapy exists, a proportion of patients who progress require chemotherapy, and many of these patients acquire resistance to the chemotherapy.

With the FDA designation, mogamulizumab is now a novel treatment for patients who have progressed after receiving at least one systemic therapy.

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