Dr. Brayer on the Emergence of BiTEs and Bispecific Antibodies in Multiple Myeloma

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>Moffitt</b>

Jason Brayer, MD, PhD, discusses the emergence of bispecific T-cell engagers and bispecific antibodies in multiple myeloma.

Jason Brayer, MD, PhD, assistant member, malignant hematology program at Moffitt Cancer Center, discusses the emergence of bispecific T-cell engagers (BiTEs) and bispecific antibodies in multiple myeloma.

T-cell redirecting therapies, such as BiTEs and bispecific antibodies, are emerging in multiple myeloma, which could expand the cellular paradigm beyond CAR T-cell therapy, Brayer explains. Not all patients with multiple myeloma are eligible for or have access to CAR T-cell therapy, so BiTEs and bispecific antibodies could create other therapeutic avenues with potentially robust responses for those patients.

Notably, BiTEs and bispecific antibodies could be used in the community setting once the field garners additional knowledge on how to best manage associated toxicities and deliver the products safely, Brayer says. As such, it could be more important for community physicians to become familiar with these agents vs CAR T-cell therapies because the management of acute CAR T-cell therapy–relate toxicities is often completed in a specialized center vs a community practice, Brayer concludes.