Dr. Hidalgo Medina on the Rationale for Using Patient-Derived Organoids in Pancreatic Cancer

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>Weill Cornell Sandra & Edward Meyer Cancer Center</b>

Manuel Hidalgo Medina, MD, PhD, chief, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medicine/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, discusses that rationale for using patient-derived organoids (PDOs) in pancreatic cancer.

Manuel Hidalgo Medina, MD, PhD, chief, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medicine/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, discusses that rationale for using patient-derived organoids (PDOs) in pancreatic cancer.

In the HOPE study, investigators tested the use of PDOs to predict a patient’s response to treatment, says Hidalgo Medina. Results from the study indicated that PDOs could help personalize therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer and ultimately, spare them the toxicities that are associated with ineffective treatments.

In the trial, a patient’s response to standard therapy was correlated with the organoid’s response to the same treatment, explains Hidalgo Medina.

The correlation indicated that PDOs could have utility in informing treatment selection in patients with pancreatic cancer, says Hidalgo Medina. However, industrialization and standardization of PDOs is needed before the tool is made ready for clinical use.