Dr. Kröger on the Role of Allogenic Stem Cell Transplant in Multiple Myeloma

April 15, 2021
Nicolaus Kröger, MD

Nicolaus Kröger, MD, discusses the role of allogenic stem cell transplant in patients with multiple myeloma.

Nicolaus Kröger, MD, a professor and medical director of the Department of Stem Cell Transplantation at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany, discusses the role of allogenic stem cell transplant in patients with multiple myeloma.

Curing multiple myeloma is a challenge, even with the advent of novel agents and CAR T-cell therapy, Kröger says. Only a small portion of patients can be cured; nearly all patients relapse at some point, Kröger says. However, data from large registry studies on the long-term use of allogenic stem cell transplantation indicate that a number of patients can be cured through transplant, Kröger explains.

Therefore, for a young patient who has relapsed following autograft, allogenic stem cell transplantation should be considered as a potentially curative treatment approach, even if novel agents are available, Kröger adds. There has only been a lack of long-term follow up for the majority of novel agents in this disease, Kröger says. Although CAR T-cell therapies are known to be effective, they are often used in a later-stage setting, with most patients relapsing after a relatively progression-free time period, Kröger concludes.