Dr. Kris on Next Steps to Improve Outcomes in Lung Cancer

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Mark G. Kris, MD, medical oncologist, William and Joy Ruane Chair in Thoracic Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the next steps to improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer.

Mark G. Kris, MD, medical oncologist, William and Joy Ruane Chair in Thoracic Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the next steps to improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer.

Despite the significant advancements that have been made regarding the treatment of patients with lung cancer, several subgroups do not derive substantial responses with available therapy, Kris explains. For example, targeted therapy has improved outcomes for many patients with oncogene-driven lung cancers, but patients eventually progress on these treatments. As such, development of novel targeted therapies or alternative options for patients who progress on these agents is needed in lung cancer, Kris says.

The integration of immunotherapy into the lung cancer paradigm has also been a significant milestone for patients with PD-L1–positive or tumor mutational burden (TMB)–high non–small cell lung cancer, Kris explains. However, patients with PD-L1–low or TMB-low disease do not reap the benefits of immunotherapy and require novel strategies.

In small cell lung cancer, immunotherapy has modestly improved median survival, but novel therapies are needed here as well to further advance the field, Kris concludes.

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