Dr. Lyman on G-CSF Biosimilars and Potential Impact on the Market | OncLive

Dr. Lyman on G-CSF Biosimilars and Potential Impact on the Market

October 1, 2019

Gary H. Lyman, MD, MPH, discusses granulocyte colony-stimulating factor biosimilars and their impact on the market.

Gary H. Lyman, MD, MPH, senior lead, Health Care Quality and Policy, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, member, Cancer Prevention Program, Public Health Services Division, and member, Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, discusses granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) biosimilars and their impact on the market.

The first biosimilar for G-CSF was approved in recent years, says Lyman. Now, there is a biosimilar for tbo-filgrastim (Granix) and 2 biosimilars for filgrastim (Neupogen). Additionally, another biosimilar for the long-acting filgrastim, pegfilgrastim (Neulasta), was recently approved for use in the United States. However, in many institutions, it is not available yet.

The key available data are with the originator product filgastrim and filgrastim-sndz (Zarxio), according to Lyman. Those data suggest a rapid uptake of the biosimilar; at least half, if not two-thirds of those using G-CSF products in the United States have switched over from the original drug to the biosimilar.

The impact on cost is challenging to discern because only very preliminary data are available to reflect on, says Lyman. However, these data suggest around a 10% to 12% decrease in price over the first year or 2 of using the G-CSF biosimilars, he adds. Similar to Europe, Lyman predicts further reductions in the cost of these products over time. With more competition, the emergence of more biosimilars, costs may decrease anywhere from 20% to 30%, concludes Lyman.


x