Dr Mohty on the Promise of Elranatamab in Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

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Mohamad Mohty, MD, PhD, discusses the promise of the phase 2 MagnetisMM-3 trial in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, which is investigating elranatamab monotherapy in this patient population.

Mohamad Mohty, MD, PhD, professor, hematology, head, the Hematology and Cellular Therapy Department, Saint-Antoine Hospital and Sorbonne University, discusses the promise of the phase 2 MagnetisMM-3 trial (NCT04649359) in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, which is investigating elranatamab (PF-06863135) monotherapy in this patient population.

In this open-label, international trial that is evaluating the efficacy of the novel bispecific antibody elranatamab, patients received 76 mg of subcutaneous elranatamab once weekly in 28-day cycles. At the 2023 EHA Congress, investigators found that at a median follow-up of 14.7 months (range, 0.2-25.1), the overall response rate was 61.0% (95% CI, 51.8%-69.6%), 35.0% of patients achieved a complete response (CR) or stringent CR, and 56.1% of patients achieved a very good partial response or better. Among evaluable patients, the median time to response was 1.2 months (range, 0.9-7.4).

Based on these beneficial outcomes, it is believed that it is possible for patients to achieve excellent progression-free survival outcomes with elranatamab while also a maintaining a good safety profile, Mohty begins. For example, the step-up dosing regimen and mode of administration of elranatamab allowed the trial investigators to limit the incidence of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity, he emphasizes.

Regarding infections, important information was derived from patients who switched dosing after 6 cycles to receive the agent every 15 days, Mohty continues. Notably, the investigators saw a clear trend toward a decrease in infectious complications with this change to the dosing schedule. This is important, as it suggests that patients may be able to receive treatment less frequently, Mohty says.

The majority of patients who switched treatment schedules were able to maintain their responses over time, and the 15-month follow-up data show a positive risk balance, Mohty continues. These data provide an excellent foundation for the continued development of this bispecific antibody, Mohty concludes.

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