Dr. Morris on Novel Approaches With Radium-223 in mCRPC

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center </b>

Michael J. Morris, MD, an associate professor of Medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer, discusses what novel combinatorial approaches researchers will be explored with radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

Michael J. Morris, MD, an associate professor of Medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer, discusses what novel combinatorial approaches researchers will be explored with radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

While bone-targeted therapy such as radium-223 can be effective, combining it with another agent would maximize outcomes, Morris explains. The same could be said for tumor-directed therapy alone, he says, adding an environmental-related metaphor as an example. One of the challenges of using tumor-directed therapy would be "equivalent of trying to kill a billion mosquitos. You can try to do that or you can try to drain the swamp." Bone-directed therapy has the latter approach, he adds.

Utilizing a blend of both approaches will ultimately lead to an improved and more durable benefit in patients, Morris explains.