Dr. O’Malley on Balstilimab and Zalifrelimab in Recurrent/Metastatic Cervical Cancer

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>The Ohio State University</b>

David M. O'Malley, MD, discusses future research directions with balstilimab and zalifrelimab in patients with cervical cancer.

David M. O'Malley, MD, professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Ohio State University (OSU) College of Medicine; director, Division of Gynecologic Oncology and Clinical Research in Gynecologic Oncology; and co-director, Gynecologic Oncology Phase I Program, The OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center–James, discusses future research directions with balstilimab (AGEN2034) and zalifrelimab (AGEN1884) in patients with cervical cancer. 

Although the phase 1/2 C-550 trial (NCT03495882) was the largest study to date to evaluate dual checkpoint blockade in patients with recurrent/metastatic cervical cancer, future efforts should focus on improving response rates in other subsets, according to O’Malley. For example, it is still necessary to expand this treatment to identify efficacy in those who are PD-L1 negative, who have adenocarcinomas, or who have been previously treated with bevacizumab (Avastin), O’Malley says.

To this end, RaPiDS (NCT03894215) is an ongoing randomized phase 2 trial evaluating the use of single-agent balstilimab vs the combination of balstilimab plus zalifrelimab in patients with recurrent/metastatic cervical cancer. The study builds upon the data and research that has focused on dual blockade as well as single-agent activity with balstilimab, O’Malley concludes.