Dr. Patel on the Clinical Implications of Luspatercept Approval in MDS

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>UT Soutwestern</b>

Prapti Patel, MD, discusses the clinical implications of the FDA approval of luspatercept-aamt in myelodysplastic syndrome.

Prapti Patel, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, discusses the clinical implications of the FDA approval of luspatercept-aamt (Reblozyl) in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

On April 3, 2020, the FDA approved luspatercept for the treatment of anemia failing an erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) and requiring 2 or more red blood cell units over 8 weeks in adult patients with very low- to intermediate-risk MDS with ring sideroblasts or with MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasm with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis.

Prior to the approval, there were no alternative options available for patients who progressed on ESAs other than chemotherapy, explains Patel.

While decitabine and azacitidine are considered “lite” or low-dose chemotherapies, they are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, says Patel.

Though patients with low-risk disease have a 7- to 10-year survival rate, they often have a poor quality of life due to transfusion dependence, explains Patel. As such, luspatercept should be considered for these patients.