Dr. Tanyi Describes a Novel Two-Step Immunotherapy

Video

Janos L. Tanyi, MD, PhD, from the University of Pennsylvania, discusses two phase I studies that examined a novel two-step immunotherapy for women with advanced ovarian cancer.

Janos L. Tanyi, MD, PhD, an Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses two phase I studies that examined a novel two-step immunotherapy for women with advanced ovarian cancer.

Two studies found clinically beneficial responses for a novel two-step dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy for women with stage 3 and 4 ovarian cancer. Traditionally, Tanyi notes, the response rate for these patients, when receiving second-line chemotherapy, is between 15% and 30%. However, in these studies, 61% of the 31 patients enrolled experienced a clinical benefit with the vaccine alone and 75% saw a clinical benefit when both treatments were administered.

At this time, Tanyi cautions, immunotherapy is not a cure for ovarian cancer but it is capable of controlling the disease. He notes this approach was tested in patients who received several prior therapies and, if further trials are successful, greater benefits may be demonstrated as a primary treatment for women with advanced ovarian cancer.

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