Dr. Williams on NLR as a Prognostic Biomarker in NSCLC

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>The Ohio State University</b>

Terence M. Williams, MD, PhD, discusses research examining a serum biomarker, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, in non–small cell lung cancer.

Terence M. Williams, MD, PhD, principal investigator at the Williams Lab and a member of the Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics Program at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center (OSUCCC)—The James, discusses research examining a serum biomarker, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Investigators at OSUCCC—The James recently published their institutional experience examining the serum biomarker NLR, says Williams. NLR measures the amount of neutrophils in the blood compared with the number of lymphocytes, explains Williams. In patients who have a more inflamed, poorly immunogenic tumor environment, higher NLR correlates with worse overall survival outcomes.

Through the study, investigators proved that having a high NLR predicted worse outcomes to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), says Williams. The patient population evaluated had early-stage NSCLC, mainly stage I disease, and received SBRT, concludes Williams.