Dr. Zhen on the Need for Novel Therapies in Poorly Differentiated Small-Cell-Type NETs

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>SCCA</b>

David Zhen, MD, discusses the need for novel therapies in poorly differentiated small-cell-type neuroendocrine tumors.

David Zhen, MD, assistant professor, University of Washington School of Medicine, assistant professor, Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, physician, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, discusses the need for novel therapies in poorly differentiated small-cell-type neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

Limited therapeutic progress has been made in poorly differentiated small-cell-type NETs, Zhen says. Historically, the treatment paradigm has been based on experience with other small-cell-type diseases, such as small cell lung cancer. As such, platinum/etoposide chemotherapy has remained the standard of care for patients with poorly differentiated small-cell-type NETs but provides modest responses. The median progression-free survival is between 4 and 6 months and overall survival is often less than 1 year, Zhen adds.

To improve upon the limited responses noted with platinum/etoposide, an ongoing phase 2/3 clinical trial (NCT05058651) is evaluating platinum/etoposide with or without atezolizumab (Tecentriq) in patients with poorly differentiated extrapulmonary small cell NETs, Zhen concludes.