Oppong Sheds Light on Racial Disparities in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Mortality

In Partnership With:

Dr Oppong discusses factors that contribute to the ongoing disparity in breast cancer deaths among Black women vs White women, the importance of increased access to high-quality screening, and the need for more inclusive research efforts to close the gaps in breast cancer diagnosis and care.

Welcome to OncLive On Air®! I’m your host today, Ashling Wahner.

OncLive On Air® is a podcast from OncLive®, which provides oncology professionals with the resources and information they need to provide the best patient care. In both digital and print formats, OncLive® covers every angle of oncology practice, from new technology to treatment advances to important regulatory decisions.

In today’s episode, we had the pleasure of speaking with Bridget A. Oppong, MD, a surgical oncologist and deputy director of the Center for Cancer Health Equity at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center–James, as well as a professor in the Division of Surgical Oncology at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Dr Oppong joined us to talk about racial disparities in breast cancer.

Although breast cancer mortality rates have steadily declined over the past few decades, Black women with breast cancer are still 40% more likely to die from their disease than White women, according to the 2022 American Cancer Society update on female breast cancer statistics in the United States. Additionally, of all racial and ethnic groups, Black women have the lowest 5-year relative survival rate for all molecular subtypes and stages of disease other than stage I.

In our exclusive interview, Dr Oppong discussed factors that contribute to the ongoing disparity in breast cancer deaths among Black women vs White women, the importance of increased access to high-quality screening, and the need for policymakers and health care systems to leverage more inclusive research efforts to close the gaps in breast cancer diagnosis and care.

___

That’s all we have for today! Thank you for listening to this episode of OncLive On Air®. Check back on Mondays and Thursdays for exclusive interviews with leading experts in the oncology field.

For more updates in oncology, be sure to visit www.OncLive.com and sign up for our e-newsletters.

OncLive® is also on social media. On Twitter, follow us at @OncLive and @OncLiveSOSS. On Facebook, like us at OncLive and OncLive State of the Science Summit and follow our OncLive page on LinkedIn.

If you liked today’s episode of OncLive On Air®, please consider subscribing to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, and many of your other favorite podcast platforms,* so you get a notification every time a new episode is posted. While you are there, please take a moment to rate us!

Thanks again for listening to OncLive On Air®.

*OncLive On Air® is available on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audacy, CastBox, Deezer, iHeart, JioSaavn, Listen Notes, Player FM, Podcast Addict, Podchaser, RadioPublic, and TuneIn.

Related Videos
View All
Related Content