Winship Cancer Institute Names Ramalingam as New Executive Director

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>Winship</b>

Suresh S. Ramalingam, MD, has been named executive director of Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

Suresh S. Ramalingam, MD, has been named executive director of Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

An internationally renowned thoracic oncologist and physician scientist, Ramalingam has served as Winship's deputy director since 2016. He begins his new post July 1.

Ramalingam takes the helm at a transformational moment for Winship, Georgia's only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center. He will preside over the largest expansion in Winship's history, including the construction and opening of a new 17-story cancer facility on the campus of Emory University Hospital Midtown. He will also lead Winship as it seeks renewal of its NCI designation.

As executive director, Ramalingam will continue to lead efforts to extend local access to cancer research and care at Emory Healthcare's six hospitals throughout metro-Atlanta, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta VA Medical Center, and Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

"Dr. Ramalingam is the ideal person to lead Winship into the future of cancer research and care," says Jonathan S. Lewin, MD, executive vice president for health affairs at Emory, executive director of Woodruff Health Sciences Center and CEO and chair of the board Emory Healthcare. "He has been instrumental to our success in seamlessly blending Winship's three missions: research, clinical and education. His collaborative experience and skills will be critical as we enter new frontiers in the world of cancer that will revolutionize the way we treat those who are diagnosed with this deadly disease."

Ramalingam was selected following a national search led by Lewin with the support of key leaders at Emory. The search produced an impressive array of candidates from across the country, including outstanding external and internal candidates.

"I have been impressed with all I have learned about Winship Cancer Institute during my first year at Emory. It is poised to grow in stature and impact and Dr. Ramalingam has the experience, vision and expertise to cultivate breakthroughs in research and clinical care as we open this exciting new chapter,” says Emory President Gregory L. Fenves.

"For millions across the United States, cancer is all too personal and Dr. Ramalingam – along with his extraordinary colleagues – approaches his lifesaving work at Winship with patients and families at the very heart of all he does."

Ramalingam's research has focused on the development of individualized therapies for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. He is principal investigator for Winship's Lung Cancer SPORE, an NCI specialized program of research excellence; has published more than 200 peer reviewed studies; and served as president of the Georgia Society of Clinical Oncology. Ramalingam also led the integration of Winship's research, clinical and educational components.

"I am deeply honored by the trust placed in me to lead Winship," says Ramalingam. "With its exceptional researchers, physicians, nurses and staff, Winship is well-positioned to make seminal contributions to improving the lives of cancer patients everywhere. Together, we will continue to build Winship's eminence as a destination cancer center, and we will remain steadfast in our dedication to accelerating cures and inspiring hope."

In addition to his Winship duties, Ramalingam serves as assistant dean for cancer research at Emory University School of Medicine, where he is also professor of hematology and medical oncology, director of the Division of Medical Oncology, and the Roberto C. Goizueta Distinguished Chair for Cancer Research.

Earlier this year, Ramalingam was named to serve as editor-in-chief of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. That five-year editorship begins July 1.

Before arriving at Winship in 2007, Ramalingam was an assistant professor at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Wayne State University.