Dr. Yao on the RADIANT-4 Study for NETs of Lung or GI Origin

James C. Yao, MD
Published: Saturday, Oct 17, 2015



James C. Yao, MD, professor, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses results of the RADIANT-4 study, which examined the safety and efficacy of everolimus in advanced nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of lung or gastrointestinal (GI) origin.

The area of NETs of lung and GI origin is an unmet need, Yao explains, due to a lack of approved agents that demonstrate clinical activity in these patients. Lung NETs make up 25% to 30% of all patients with NETs. Though somatostatin analogs are available for patients who are treatment-naïve and/or have stable disease, there is a need to treat progressive disease, he explains.

RADIANT-4 randomized approximately 300 patients with aggressive disease 2:1 to everolimus versus placebo. Eligibility criteria included documentation of progression and nonfunctional NETs. Results showed a significance benefit in progression-free survival (PFS), with 7.1 months being the median PFS, Yao says.

<<< View more from the 2015 NANETS Symposium



James C. Yao, MD, professor, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses results of the RADIANT-4 study, which examined the safety and efficacy of everolimus in advanced nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of lung or gastrointestinal (GI) origin.

The area of NETs of lung and GI origin is an unmet need, Yao explains, due to a lack of approved agents that demonstrate clinical activity in these patients. Lung NETs make up 25% to 30% of all patients with NETs. Though somatostatin analogs are available for patients who are treatment-naïve and/or have stable disease, there is a need to treat progressive disease, he explains.

RADIANT-4 randomized approximately 300 patients with aggressive disease 2:1 to everolimus versus placebo. Eligibility criteria included documentation of progression and nonfunctional NETs. Results showed a significance benefit in progression-free survival (PFS), with 7.1 months being the median PFS, Yao says.

<<< View more from the 2015 NANETS Symposium




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