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The Future of HCC Management

Insights From: Riccardo Lencioni MD, University of Miami Health System
Published: Monday, May 13, 2019



Transcript: 

Riccardo Lencioni, MD: Hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] in a way is a unique cancer. Generally, with cancer, either you can offer a curative approach mostly with surgery, sometimes surgery and radiation, or it’s going to be a palliative therapy. HCC is different because even those patients who are suitable candidates for radical therapy with resection or ablation are exposed to a very high rate of tumor recurrences. So, clearly, outcomes are unsatisfactory in the long term.

On the other hand, you have a large patient population that despite having large or multifocal disease, still doesn’t show any evidence of extrahepatic spread. So there is no node involvement, no extrahepatic metastasis. It’s a complex generally where I think these ongoing studies combining the best locoregional approaches with ablation, or chemoembolization, or radioembolization and the checkpoint inhibitors will try to clarify whether there is a synergy between these 2 therapies, so that we can offer more and more patients a chance for cure or at least for a sustained response eventually resulting in longer progression-free survival and overall survival. So I think these trials can change the practice and probably revolutionize the treatment of HCC over the next few years.

Transcript Edited for Clarity
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Transcript: 

Riccardo Lencioni, MD: Hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] in a way is a unique cancer. Generally, with cancer, either you can offer a curative approach mostly with surgery, sometimes surgery and radiation, or it’s going to be a palliative therapy. HCC is different because even those patients who are suitable candidates for radical therapy with resection or ablation are exposed to a very high rate of tumor recurrences. So, clearly, outcomes are unsatisfactory in the long term.

On the other hand, you have a large patient population that despite having large or multifocal disease, still doesn’t show any evidence of extrahepatic spread. So there is no node involvement, no extrahepatic metastasis. It’s a complex generally where I think these ongoing studies combining the best locoregional approaches with ablation, or chemoembolization, or radioembolization and the checkpoint inhibitors will try to clarify whether there is a synergy between these 2 therapies, so that we can offer more and more patients a chance for cure or at least for a sustained response eventually resulting in longer progression-free survival and overall survival. So I think these trials can change the practice and probably revolutionize the treatment of HCC over the next few years.

Transcript Edited for Clarity
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