Dr. Coleman on Rationale for Using Veliparib and Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer

Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS
Published: Monday, Oct 14, 2019



Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS, professor, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses what makes veliparib a unique agent in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. 
  
The phase III VELIA trial evaluated the PARP inhibitor veliparib in combination with chemotherapy followed by veliparib as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Investigators reported an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) and reduced risk of progression or death with the combination versus placebo plus chemotherapy with placebo maintenance.  
 
PARP inhibitors have been evaluated in ovarian cancer ever since preclinical models demonstrated their efficacy in BRCA1/2-mutated tumors, says Coleman. These agents have catalytic engagement of PARP and can trap the PARP enzyme onto DNA.
 
According to Coleman, veliparib is unique because it appears to be a weak PARP trapper which allows it to be given in combination with full-dose, cytotoxic chemotherapy. 
 
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Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS, professor, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses what makes veliparib a unique agent in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. 
  
The phase III VELIA trial evaluated the PARP inhibitor veliparib in combination with chemotherapy followed by veliparib as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Investigators reported an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) and reduced risk of progression or death with the combination versus placebo plus chemotherapy with placebo maintenance.  
 
PARP inhibitors have been evaluated in ovarian cancer ever since preclinical models demonstrated their efficacy in BRCA1/2-mutated tumors, says Coleman. These agents have catalytic engagement of PARP and can trap the PARP enzyme onto DNA.
 
According to Coleman, veliparib is unique because it appears to be a weak PARP trapper which allows it to be given in combination with full-dose, cytotoxic chemotherapy. 
 



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