Dr. Freedland on Standardized PSA Testing in Prostate Cancer

Stephen J. Freedland, MD
Published: Thursday, Mar 05, 2020



Stephen J. Freedland, MD, Warschaw Robertson Law Families Chair in Prostate Cancer, director, Center for Integrated Research in Cancer and Lifestyle, co-director, Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program, associate director, Faculty Development Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and professor of surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, discusses the importance of standardizing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in prostate cancer.

In clinical trials, established time points for PSA are needed. However, there may not be a survival difference among patients who are discovered to have a rising PSA within 1 month of each other, so it’s reasonable to test PSA every 3 or 4 months, or even every 6 weeks in clinical practice, says Freedland.

Regardless of what time point patients undergo PSA testing, it is important that they undergo consistent testing with added follow-up, adds Freedland. Notably, some patients with undergo the first PSA test and come back 2 years later, which puts them at risk of developing progressive disease, concludes Freedland.
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


Stephen J. Freedland, MD, Warschaw Robertson Law Families Chair in Prostate Cancer, director, Center for Integrated Research in Cancer and Lifestyle, co-director, Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program, associate director, Faculty Development Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and professor of surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, discusses the importance of standardizing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing in prostate cancer.

In clinical trials, established time points for PSA are needed. However, there may not be a survival difference among patients who are discovered to have a rising PSA within 1 month of each other, so it’s reasonable to test PSA every 3 or 4 months, or even every 6 weeks in clinical practice, says Freedland.

Regardless of what time point patients undergo PSA testing, it is important that they undergo consistent testing with added follow-up, adds Freedland. Notably, some patients with undergo the first PSA test and come back 2 years later, which puts them at risk of developing progressive disease, concludes Freedland.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x