Dr. Pant on Choosing Therapy for Frontline and Beyond in Pancreatic Cancer

Shubham Pant, MD
Published: Friday, Apr 03, 2020



Shubham Pant, MD, associate medical director of the Clinical & Translational Research Center, associate professor, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses choosing therapy for the frontline and beyond in pancreatic cancer.

Treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer need to be selected on an individual level. Typically, the 2 frontline regimens are modified FOLFIRINOX or the combination of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane). FOLFIRINOX is typically used in more robust patients with a better performance status whereas gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel is used in patients who have a performance status of 2.

Pancreatic cancer is a debilitating disease; often, patients cannot receive second-line therapy. The question of whether a patient is strong enough to receive second-line treatment must be considered carefully. Will the treatment improve the quantity or quality of their life? If yes, second-line therapy should be considered, concludes Pant.
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


Shubham Pant, MD, associate medical director of the Clinical & Translational Research Center, associate professor, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses choosing therapy for the frontline and beyond in pancreatic cancer.

Treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer need to be selected on an individual level. Typically, the 2 frontline regimens are modified FOLFIRINOX or the combination of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane). FOLFIRINOX is typically used in more robust patients with a better performance status whereas gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel is used in patients who have a performance status of 2.

Pancreatic cancer is a debilitating disease; often, patients cannot receive second-line therapy. The question of whether a patient is strong enough to receive second-line treatment must be considered carefully. Will the treatment improve the quantity or quality of their life? If yes, second-line therapy should be considered, concludes Pant.



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x