Dr. Park on Ongoing Research Efforts With CAR T-Cell Therapies in ALL

Jae Park, MD
Published: Wednesday, Apr 01, 2020



Jae Park, MD, a hematologist oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the use of CAR T-cell therapies in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).
 
Several different CAR T-cell products are examining ways to target CD19, says Park. For example, one product is a single-chain variable fragment that targets CD19. Preliminary data have been reported with the product in pediatric patients and it has been shown to result in a lower rate of cytokine release syndrome, says Park. If this study is further validated then that may present a safer option for adult patients with ALL.
 
Another CAR T-cell product is an allogeneic, off-the-shelf therapy, adds Park. Challenges exist with getting adult patients with aggressive disease autologous CAR T-cell products or generating T cells from these patients. To this end, off-the-shelf donor-derived CAR T-cell products are being investigated. Preliminary data with such products have been presented in the past, but an ongoing international study is evaluating the efficacy of this approach in a larger patient population, explains Park.
 
Additionally, ongoing studies are examining bispecific CAR T cells that are targeting CD19 and CD22 at the same time. The rationale for this approach is to reduce the rate of CD19-negative relapse by targeting 2 antigens simultaneously. The final data from this research are greatly anticipated, says Park. Other ongoing clinical studies are examining the efficacy of CAR T-cell therapies with the ultimate goal of providing safer and more effective products to adult patients with ALL; this continues to be a critical unmet need, concludes Park.
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Jae Park, MD, a hematologist oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the use of CAR T-cell therapies in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).
 
Several different CAR T-cell products are examining ways to target CD19, says Park. For example, one product is a single-chain variable fragment that targets CD19. Preliminary data have been reported with the product in pediatric patients and it has been shown to result in a lower rate of cytokine release syndrome, says Park. If this study is further validated then that may present a safer option for adult patients with ALL.
 
Another CAR T-cell product is an allogeneic, off-the-shelf therapy, adds Park. Challenges exist with getting adult patients with aggressive disease autologous CAR T-cell products or generating T cells from these patients. To this end, off-the-shelf donor-derived CAR T-cell products are being investigated. Preliminary data with such products have been presented in the past, but an ongoing international study is evaluating the efficacy of this approach in a larger patient population, explains Park.
 
Additionally, ongoing studies are examining bispecific CAR T cells that are targeting CD19 and CD22 at the same time. The rationale for this approach is to reduce the rate of CD19-negative relapse by targeting 2 antigens simultaneously. The final data from this research are greatly anticipated, says Park. Other ongoing clinical studies are examining the efficacy of CAR T-cell therapies with the ultimate goal of providing safer and more effective products to adult patients with ALL; this continues to be a critical unmet need, concludes Park.



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