Dr. Davis on Caveats of the KEYNOTE-062 Trial Findings in Gastric/GEJ Cancer

June 25, 2019
S. Lindsey Davis, MD

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>University of Colorado Cancer Center</b>

S. Lindsey Davis, MD, an assistant professor of medicine and gastrointestinal medical oncologist at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, discusses caveats of the phase III KEYNOTE-062 trial findings in gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer.

S. Lindsey Davis, MD, an assistant professor of medicine and gastrointestinal medical oncologist at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, discusses caveats of the phase III KEYNOTE-062 trial findings in gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer.

Immunotherapy has garnered a lot of excitement in gastric and GEJ cancer, following the incorporation of several FDA-approved agents in the third-line setting for patients with PD-L1—positive disease. However, there have been some setbacks, explains Davis.

For example, data from the KEYNOTE-062 trial were negative. The addition of frontline pembrolizumab (Keytruda) to standard cisplatin and either 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine did not show a significant benefit in overall survival, progression-free survival, or response rate in patients with advanced gastric/GEJ cancer versus chemotherapy alone. However, there are several ongoing studies exploring immunotherapy in various lines of therapy.

Notably, investigators observed some benefit in patients who had a PD-L1 (combined positive score [CPS]) of ≥1; these patients experienced a better response with the addition of pembrolizumab to standard chemotherapy. Moreover, a subsequent analysis showed that patients with even higher scores—a CPS of 10—seemed to have even better outcomes with that type of therapy, concludes Davis.


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