Dr. Monk on Remaining Unmet Needs in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

Supplements And Featured Publications, Novel Targets in the Ovarian Cancer Treatment Paradigm, Volume 1, Issue 1

Bradley J. Monk, MD, FACS, FACOG, discusses existing unmet needs in the treatment of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.

Bradley J. Monk, MD, FACS, FACOG, professor, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Arizona Oncology (US Oncology Network), University of Arizona College of Medicine, Creighton University School of Medicine at St. Joseph’s Hospital, medical director, Gynecologic Program, US Oncology Research Network, and co-director, GOG Partners, discusses existing unmet needs in the treatment of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.

Recurrent ovarian cancer is a terminal condition, according to Monk. Disease is often classified based on the patient’s response to platinum-based chemotherapy, Monk explains. Ovarian cancer is generally treated with a platinum doublet such as liposomal doxorubicin, or paclitaxel or gemcitabine, with or without bevacizumab (Avastin), and sometimes with a PARP inhibitor in the maintenance setting, Monk adds.

Although these regimens have demonstrated efficacy, patients will ultimately recur and succumb to their disease, Monk says. Since the FDA approval of bevacizumab in 2014, no new agents have been approved for use in the subset of patients with platinum-resistant disease. Additional treatment options are needed for those with platinum-sensitive and -recurrent disease, Monk concludes.