Dr. Richardson on Preliminary Data With Belantamab Mafodotin in Multiple Myeloma

December 12, 2019
Paul G. Richardson, MD

Special Issues, Emerging MOAs in Multiple Myeloma: Updates From the 17th IMW, Volume 1, Issue 1

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>Dana Farber</b>

Paul G. Richardson, MD, clinical program leader and director of clinical research, Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center, and institute physician, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and RJ Corman Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, discusses the preliminary data that has been reported with belantamab mafodotin (GSK2857916) in multiple myeloma.

Paul G. Richardson, MD, clinical program leader and director of clinical research, Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center, and institute physician, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and RJ Corman Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, discusses the preliminary data that has been reported with belantamab mafodotin (GSK2857916) in multiple myeloma.

Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are unique in that they deliver a higher payload of cytotoxic therapy—in this case, auristatin—directly into the tumor cell, explains Richardson. Once the auristatin is internalized and the cell undergoes apoptosis, additional antigens are generated; this process is thought to enhance immune response.

According to data from the phase I DREAMM-1 trial, the anti-BCMA ADC, belantamab mafodotin, led to a 60% overall response rate in patients with double- or triple-class refractory disease. In patients who were refractory to daratumumab (Darzalex), the ORR was 38.5%, says Richardson.

Subsequently, the phase II DREAMM-2 trial was launched to evaluate 1 of 2 doses of the drug in the relapsed/refractory setting. Earlier this year, GSK, the developers of the drug, announced that the trial had met its primary endpoint, demonstrating a clinically meaningful improvement in ORR with the ADC, concludes Richardson.