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Evolving Role of Surgery in Multidisciplinary Care for Head and Neck Cancer

Danielle Bucco
Published: Monday, Dec 18, 2017

The second thing I would say is that we are going to have a host of imaging technologies available. They are just starting to become clinically applicable. We are going to know exactly where the tumor is so that when we do surgery, we can make sure that we get all the cancer [out] most of the time and reduce the need for additional therapy, such as debilitating combination therapy. We can choose who is good for surgery, who is not, and who is better treated with other therapeutic approaches, such as radiation, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy. 

How is surgery an integrated part of the team?

Historically, we are unlike a lot of other surgeries. We follow our patients throughout the rest of their lifetimes and we are an integrated part of the care team. There are other things we can do as surgeons, for example. We can move salivary glands out of the way of radiation for patients with good saliva function to swallow better and have a better quality of life.

We do not think of ourselves as an isolated [group] to take out the cancer, but we are also there to reconstruct, rehabilitate, and help people get on their way to being well. 

The head and neck is all about who we are, how we interact socially, and how we feel about ourselves. Social things that we do with other people are eating, talking, and communicating. There are many who now have these functions after head and neck cancer.


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Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
Community Practice Connections™: Precision Medicine for Community Oncologists: Assessing the Role of Tumor-Testing Technologies in Cancer CareNov 30, 20181.0
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