Dr. Harding on Future Directions in the Treatment of Advanced Biliary Tract Cancers

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James Harding, MD, discusses future directions in the treatment of patients with advanced biliary tract cancer.

James Harding, MD, gastrointestinal oncologist, assistant attending physician, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses future directions in the treatment of patients with advanced biliary tract cancer.

Continued efforts are ongoing to evaluate immunotherapy combinations for the treatment of biliary tract cancer, Harding begins. These investigations include novel combinations that were discussed at the 2023 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, including atezolizumab (Tecentriq) plus bevacizumab (Avastin), gemcitabine and capecitabine vs atezolizumab plus gemcitabine and capecitabine in the phase 2 IMbrave 151 trial (NCT04677504). This trial will require further follow-up, Harding notes.

Additionally, investigators are still exploring ways to implement precision medicine in the treatment of biliary tract cancer, Harding continues. Also at the 2023 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, additional data were reported on the use of FGFR inhibitors, including a cohort of patients with FGFR2 fusion–positive cholangiocarcinoma treated with erdafitinib (Balversa) from the phase 2 RAGNAR trial (NCT04083976), Harding notes. Data from study showed an objective response rate of 60.0% (95% CI, 42.1-76.1), which underscores the potential for a precision medicine approach in cholangiocarcinoma, Harding says.

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