Experts Discuss Management of Skin and Mouth TRAEs Associated With EGFR TKIs

Christine Lovly, MD, PhD, Jeanne G. Vaughn, NP, Kristina Lo, PharmD, BCOP, and Linda Ahn discuss how to approach treatment-related adverse effects of the skin and mouth associated with the use of EGFR TKIs.

Christine Lovly, MD, PhD, Jeanne G. Vaughn, NP, Kristina Lo, PharmD, BCOP, and Linda Ahn discuss how to approach treatment-related adverse effects (TRAEs) of the skin and mouth associated with the use of EGFR TKIs.

Christine Lovly, MD, PhD, is an associate professor of medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, an Ingram associate professor of cancer research, and co-leader of Translational Research and Interventional Oncology Program at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center. Jeanne G. Vaughn, NP is a nurse practitioner at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. Kristina Lo, PharmD, BCOP, is a pharmacist of the Oncology Specialty Program Services at University of California Davis. Linda Ahn is a clinical trial nurse practitioner, Thoracic Medicine Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Although skin creams might seem like simple solutions, topical applications are practical for combating TRAEs, Lovly explains. Applying skin cream or hair solution can be mentally taxing when repeated every day, making it vital for clinicians and nurses to provide counseling and emotional support to patients, Lovly adds.

Regarding mouth sores and other oral TRAEs, baking soda and saltwater rinses can serve as simple solutions for some patients, Vaughn explains, adding that stronger interventions can be added when needed. Lo notes that instructing patients to create large batches of salt water or baking soda mixes can save time from tedious mixing each day. However, home remedies may sometimes lead to dry lips, in which Aquaphor or triamcinolone dental paste can be used, Lo and Ahn conclude.

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